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Seed to Shirt
Growing Cotton
Processing Cotton
The Textile Process -- Knitting, Dyeing and Finishing
The Cut-and-Sew Process
  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    At STAR, the fabric lots arrive and are marked with a six-digit tracking number to prepare them for the cut-and-sew process.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    A machine unloads the fabric with a quarter-turn and lays it in long rows on a table.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    Next, a piece of cardboard with tiny perforations is laid over top, and chalk is rubbed on top of it. The chalk falls through and marks the fabric where it will be cut.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    The dotted chalk marks on the fabric indicate where it should be cut.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    An automatic saw cuts through the fabric and leaves rolls of T-shirt bodies and sleeves that will later be sewn together. At this point the fabric hardly resembles a T-shirt.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    The cut fabric is tied up into bundles that will be sent over to the sewing lines.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    The fabric now goes through the sewing process. The bottom is hemmed, the shoulders are joined, the collar is attached, and the sleeves and necktape are added.

  • The Cut-and-Sew Facility

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    Lastly, the shirt is given a final inspection to make sure all the stitching is correct.


From Seed To Shirt: Vlogs


W
earables Editor C.J. Mittica witnessed the making of apparel firsthand with a multinational trip that took him from Texas to North Carolina to Honduras. Check out his videoblog posts from each step along the way as you follow his journey.

Watch the videos in the custom player at left, or on YouTube by clicking on the videos below.

 

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